Sleep for Science
Staff
Mary A Carskadon, Ph.D.
Mary A Carskadon, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown Medical School; Director, E.P. Bradley Hospital Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab

Sleep research has been very good to me! From a small-town childhood, I landed at Gettysburg College, where I studied psychology, played field hockey and tennis, and made many life-long friends. I then moved west and was a research assistant at the Stanford Sleep Lab before attending graduate school at Stanford Medical School from 1976 to 1979, receiving a Ph.D. in neuro- and biobehavioral sciences, specializing in sleep research. I worked with Dr. William C. Dement and many other wonderful scientists and students at Stanford before moving to RI to start my own research group in 1985. At Bradley Hospital and Brown University, I have been privileged to perform research supported by the NIMH, NINR, NHLBI, NIDA, NCI, NIAAA, NASA, the Sleep Research Society Foundation, Periodic Breathing Foundation, and the Grass Foundation. I have also had the great pleasure of working with a terrific group of scientists, trainees, research participants, and their families. My science has also garnered me invitations to travel all over the US and Canada, to many European countries, as well as to Israel, Saudi Arabia, Japan, and Australia. Do science and see the world, I say! Whenever weather permits, I enjoy goofing around with golf.




Katie Sharkey, M.D., Ph.D.
Katie Sharkey, M.D., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Departments of Internal Medicine and Psychiatry & Human Behavior, Brown Medical School; Associate Director, Sleep for Science Research Lab, Director, Perinatal Project

I grew up in Rhode Island and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a B.A. in Psychology. After college, I spent three years as a research assistant here at the Bradley Sleep Laboratory. In 1994, I moved to Chicago, IL, to enroll in the MD/PhD program at Rush University. There, I worked with Dr. Charmane Eastman studying melatonin and shift work. I graduated in 2002 and stayed at Rush to complete my residency in Internal Medicine and Psychiatry. I have now come full circle: in July, 2007, I moved back to Rhode Island where I practice sleep medicine and perform research on sleep and circadian rhythms. My main research interests are in sleep and mood regulation. I am also interested in women's health. I am currently working on studies of sleep and circadian rhythms in illnesses including postpartum depression, substance abuse, obesity, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Outside of the lab, I enjoy spending time with my husband and our two little boys as well as my extended family.




Leila Tarokh, Ph.D.
Leila Tarokh, Ph.D.
Adjunct Instructor, Psychiatry & Human Behavior, Brown Medical School; Data Analyst, E.P. Bradley Hospital Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab

I grew up in three very different cities: Tehran, Albuquerque and San Diego. I got my B.S. from the University of California, San Diego in 2000 and did my Ph.D. work two hours north of San Diego at the University of California, Irvine. After graduating I joined the E.P. Bradley Sleep Lab as a postdoctoral fellow. My primary area of interest is in sleep EEG changes across adolescent development. In collaboration with Professor Peter Achermann at the Univeristy of Zurich, we are examining sleep homeostatic processes as well as making use of the sleep EEG as a tool to study healthy brain development.




Tifenn Raffray, M.D.
Tifenn Raffray, M.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown University; E.P. Bradley Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab.

I studied medicine near Paris, France, at the University of Versailles - Saint Quentin en Yvelines. I received my Medical Degree with a specialization in Psychiatry and Sleep Medicine in 2008 and collaborated as a research assistant with Pr. Damien Leger at the Sleep and Wakefulness Center (Hotel-Dieu Hospital, Paris). I was involved in studies on shift work, jetlag and chronic insomnia. †In 2001, I had the great opportunity to spend a summer at the Stanford Sleep Lab learning sleep medicine and taking part in research studies on sleep restriction, working with Pr. Christian Guilleminault. Thanks to the 2006 Stanford-France Exchange Program, I received training on CBT for insomnia with Pr. Rachel Manber. After my residency, I was fortunate to spend two years at the Bradley Sleep Lab working as a research fellow on overnight learning in children with ADHD and on the genetic risk factors for insomnia. In addition, I had the chance to improve my clinical skills at the pediatric sleep clinic and the insomnia clinic at Rhode Island Hospital. I am currently a psychiatrist at Lausanne University Hospital in Switzerland and I am involved in research projects on sleep and psychiatric disorders. During my free time, I enjoy skiing, hiking, and visiting my family in the Alps.




Kathryn Orzech, Ph.D.
Kathryn Orzech, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown University; E.P. Bradley Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab.

I grew up in Fairfax, Virginia and graduated from the College of William and Mary with a B.A. in anthropology in 1997. After working as a health care research assistant, a law librarian, and a database specialist, I began graduate school in anthropology at the University of Arizona in 2001. After completing my Masters degree in 2003, I became interested in the anthropology of sleep. I made the acquaintance of Dr. Richard Bootzin at U of A, who invited me to join his sleep lab. My PhD in anthropology examined adolescent sleep from a biocultural perspective, exploring sleep patterns, perceptions and coping behaviors among high school freshmen. My current research interests include how culture affects sleep patterns and perceptions, how individuals cope with sleep loss, and the relationships between sleep and health. Outside of the lab I enjoy spending time with my husband and daughter and exploring our new home state of Rhode Island.




Brandy Roane, Ph.D.
Brandy Roane, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown University; E.P. Bradley Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab.

Being an Army brat precludes me from having just one town to call home. All together Iíve lived in 8 states and Germany, visited many other places, and have stopped counting the number of times Iíve moved within one state. I obtained my BS in Psychology at the University of Texas at Dallas. I obtained my PhD in Clinical Health Psychology at the University of North Texas where I worked with Dr. Daniel Taylor focusing on insomnia in adolescents and college students. I worked with Brett Kuhn at the University of Nebraska Medical Center focusing on pediatric sleep disorders while I completed my clinical internship. In July 2010, my Native Texas husband, two awesome boys, and I moved to Rhode Island so I could work in the sleep lab. Currently, my research focuses on sleep and its correlates in adolescents and college students. I can also be found at the pediatric sleep clinic once a week. When not at the lab, Iím playing LEGOs, superheros and other pretend games with my sons, playing video games with my husband, and pursuing various other interests.




Caroline Gredvig-Ardito
Caroline Gredvig-Ardito
Data Coordinator, E.P. Bradley Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab.

My father was in the military so I grew up in a lot of different places. I was born in Naples, Italy and from there we moved to Dallas, Texas. My family ultimately settled in Portland, Oregon when I was 13, and most of my family still lives there. I graduated from the University of Oregon with a BA in Psychology. I worked as a counselor with adolescents in Oregon and in San Francisco. My husband and I moved to Rhode Island in 2001 and Iíve been working in research since then. Initially I worked at Brownís Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, and recently I was at the Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine at The Miriam Hospital. Iíve always had in interest in better understanding the relationship between lifestyle, stress and health outcomes. I am excited to learn more about the science of sleep and the complexities of the data collected in the lab. Outside the lab I enjoy music, movies, traveling, and exploring all the natural beauties Rhode Island has to offer.




Max Elliott
Max Elliott
Administrative Secretary, E.P. Bradley Hospital Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab

I have been fortunate enough to be the lab secretary since 1998. It's rewarding to know that my administrative support is helping such a dedicated group of scientists. When I'm not moving around a tall stack of papers on my desk, I live happily with my family in a sleepy suburb.




David Bushnell
David Bushnell
Senior Sleep Research Assistant, E.P. Bradley Hospital Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab

I graduated from Wesleyan University in May 2002 with a BA in Psychology. I joined the Sleep Lab in September of 2002 after working at the Wesleyan Sleep Lab during my last two years on campus. I played shortstop for the Wesleyan Baseball team and still currently play in two leagues here in Rhode Island. I also play basketball year round and try to get out on the trails hiking as much as possible.




Ellyn Ferriter
Ellyn Ferriter
Sleep Research Technologist, E.P. Bradley Hospital Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab

I spent the first 20 years of my life in Connecticut until my fatherís job brought us to Kalamazoo, Michigan (yes, it does exist). I graduated from Western Michigan University in April 2009 with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology. During my last semester there I designed a practicum, which allowed me to intern at a clinical sleep lab. There I worked both day and night shifts learning everything from applying electrodes to diagnostic criteria and treatment for certain sleep disorders. While I was doing my internship I found out about a research opportunity here at the Bradley Sleep Lab. I applied and started working as part of the technical staff in May 2009. Itís great to be back on the east coast. When Iím not in the lab you can find me listening to techno, playing my guitar, taking trips to Connecticut to spend quality time with friends, and hanging out with friends in Providence. I eventually would like to pursue working in a clinical sleep lab as an RPSGT and possibly go on to graduate school to study sleep and cognition.




Sharon Driscoll
Sharon Driscoll
Sleep Research Assistant, E.P. Bradley Hospital Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab

I grew up in upstate New York and graduated from Cornell University in May 2012 with a Bachelor of Science in Human Biology. After my junior year of college, I spent a summer at the lab as a Dement Fellow. After graduating, I returned to the lab to work full time. Outside of the lab, I enjoy spending time on the shore and boating in New England.




Ashten Bartz
Ashten Bartz
Sleep Research Assistant, E.P. Bradley Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab

I grew up in a small town in western Connecticut prior to attending Vassar College in upstate New York. I graduated in May 2013 with a B.A. in Cognitive Science. During my senior year, I had the opportunity to pursue a conceptual thesis exploring sleep-dependent memory consolidation and its implications for neurorehabilitation. In the future, I plan to further integrate my interests of sleep and cognition, neuroscience, and neural prosthetics/robotics through my Ph.D. studies. My hobbies outside of the lab include creative writing, field hockey, and running.




Michelle Loxley
Michelle Loxley
Programmer and Database Manager, E.P. Bradley Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab.

I grew up in Foster, Rhode Island and graduated from New England Institute of Technology in 2003 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Programming. I specialize in web-based data collection and database development and have worked with researchers at Brown University for 5 years. In 2009, I joined the E.P. Bradley Sleep Lab team as a consulting programmer. Outside of the lab, I enjoy spending time with my family and friends, gardening, and have a small hobby farm with chickens.




Mary Schreitmueller, B.A., R.N.
Mary Schreitmueller, B.A., R.N.
Research Nurse, E.P. Bradley Hospital Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab

They say that native Rhode Islanders fall into one of two categories: those that never leave Rhode Island and those that return. I am a "returner," having lived in Connecticut twice and New Jersey once before returning to Rhode Island the last time in 1996. Though I started as a high school social studies teacher after graduating from Colby College, I returned to school to become a nurse after becoming interested in maternal-child health through the birth of my daughters. I consider myself a community nurse, and have had experience as a visiting nurse, a community health educator, a Family Outreach nurse, a Head Start nurse and most recently, a research nurse primarily with the Maternal Lifestyle Study at the Brown Center at Women & Infants Hospital. My interest and focus has always been health education around child and adolescent development. I conduct brief physical exams and Tanner staging of the adolescent participants of Dr. Carskadon's Intrinsic Period Sleep Study. Outside of work I enjoy training my dog in obedience and agility and also like to spend time with my husband either traveling, hiking or skiing. We also enjoy cooking together for family.




Christine Acebo, Ph.D.
Christine Acebo, Ph.D.
Affiliated Faculty
Adjunct Assistant Professor (Research), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown Medical School; Affiliated Faculty, E.P. Bradley Hospital Sleep and Chronobiology Research Lab

I was raised in Colorado but came to the east coast as soon as I had a choice. I have an A.B. as a political science major (Vassar College), an M.A. in Developmental Psychology (Teachers College, Columbia Univ.) and a Ph.D. in Biobehavioral Sciences (Univ. of CT). My dissertation research involved many long, long hours recording everything mothers and babies did, both together and apart. I chose to analyze the infant sleep/wake data for my dissertation because it seemed so much less complex than the mother-infant interaction data. I have learned a bit since then about complexity. I have recently taken a position with Cephalon, Inc. as a Medical Science Liaison so my primary work is no longer research, although I visit many of the top research scientists in New England as part of my job. Photography takes up most of my free time.